Author Archives: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management

About Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management

Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (IEAM) is published quarterly by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC). The journal is devoted to bridging the gap between scientific research and the use of science in decision making, regulation, and environmental management. IEAM aims to be the premier scientific journal for presenting new information, promoting dialogue, and fostering new methods for analysis of biological, ecological, chemical, engineering, environmental, physical and social science research applicable to the advancement of environmental policy and regulation, environmental management strategies, and sound approaches to environmental problem-solving. IEAM provides a peer-reviewed international forum for communicating new ideas and information from environmental science professionals in academia, business, government, and nongovernmental organizations. The journal welcomes scientific, social, and regulatory information through critical reviews, original research, commentaries, policy analyses, case studies, and special series. IEAM strives to provide a unique position in the peer-reviewed literature, focusing on continually evolving collaborations by offering perspectives from diverse disciplines and a variety of stakeholders. The internationally recognized scientists, academicians, and policy specialists who serve as subject matter Editors, members of the Editorial Board, and manuscript reviewers reflect this diversity of views and experience in each of the following major topic areas: Climate change challenges Decision analysis Ecological and human health risk assessment Environment impact analysis Environmental policy and regulation Environmental management Life cycle analysis and sustainable environmental practices In addition, IEAM regularly features non–peer-reviewed Learned Discourses that provide a forum for rapid communication of professional opinions on timely scientific issues, and Book Reviews that alert the scientific community to new publications in the broad field of environmental science.

Getting to the Root of It: Why Plants Matter and How We Can Best Protect Them

The following post previews the research that will be presented at the SETAC Europe Annual Meeting, held virtually as SciCon (3–7 May 2020).

A guest post by Verena Sesin, Steering Committee member of the SETAC Global Plants Interest Group

From our backyards, to parks, nature areas, and agriculture – plants surround us! We often forget that plants not only look pretty, but they are also vital for our daily lives. Plants are key parts of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In rivers, wetlands, grasslands, forests, agricultural fields, and various other habitats, plants provide shelter and food for many animals, from tiny microbes and invertebrates, to large mammals – including us humans. And, don’t forget, plants use the light energy from the sun to produce macromolecules and oxygen – a very special skill that supports all life on our planet. Continue reading

Can Polymers Represent an Aquatic Risk—What’s Known and Unknown?

The following post is one of a series previewing the research that will be presented at the SETAC Europe Annual Meeting, held virtually as SciCon (3–7 May 2020, formerly to be held in Dublin, Ireland).

A guest post by Hans Sanderson, Anna Magdalene, Brun Hansen, Scott Belanger, Kristin Connors, and Monica Lam

Polymers are most known for their use in plastics (e.g., polypropylene), and while it is true that all plastics are polymers, it is not true that all polymers are plastics. Polymers have a much wider range of origins and uses and contain a wide variety of materials with differing structural attributes, functionalization, and physical and chemical properties.

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Desert Locusts: Unprecedented Swarms Destroy Farmland and Intensify Food Insecurity in East Africa and Beyond

By Roberta Attanasio, IEAM Blog Editor

Locusts—the oldest migratory pests in the world—are decimating crops and threatening food security in East Africa. Unlike ordinary grasshoppers, these pests gregarize and migrate over long distances. The most devastating of all locust species is the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria), which is currently swarming at extraordinary levels. According to the latest update (5 March 2020) provided by Locust Watch, “The situation remains extremely alarming in the Horn of Africa, specifically Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia where widespread breeding is in progress and new swarms are starting to form, representing an unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods at the beginning of the upcoming cropping season.” Continue reading

Achievement of UN Sustainable Development Goals at the Local Level May Shift Across Time and Geographical Areas

By Roberta Attanasio, IEAM Blog Editor

In 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations agreed upon a blueprint to end poverty, fight inequality, and protect the environment. Governments promised to meet 17 global sustainable development goals by 2030, thus establishing the Sustainable Development Agenda and a to-do list for people and planet. With only 10 years left until the deadline, assessing the progress towards the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is of the utmost importance to guide policy development and implementation.

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Wild Pigs Spell Trouble for North American Biodiversity

By Roberta Attanasio, IEAM Blog Editor

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A feral swine sounder causing erosion by using a wallow on Havasu National Wildlife Refuge property. Removal of these invasive feral swine supports the refuge’s mission of conservation and recovery of native wildlife. US Fish and Wildlife photo.

Wild pigs—also known as wild hogs, wild boars, feral swine, or razorbacks— are wreaking havoc around the world, from trashing European cities to invading the mystical Malaysian island of Pulau Besar by crossing coastal waters. In the US, wild pigs, aptly designated an “infestation machine,” are considered to be the most damaging invasive species. Continue reading

Climate Change and Warmer Temperatures: A Growth Opportunity for Blue Crabs

By Roberta Attanasio, IEAM Blog Editor

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Blue crabs. CC-BY-NC 2.0

With their sapphire-tinted claws, their olive green shell, and their paddle-shaped rear swimming legs, blue crabs are easily recognizable. They’re famous not only for their looks, but also for their telltale scientific name (Callinectes sapidus), which translates roughly to “savory beautiful swimmer.” Indeed, they’re prized for their tender meat and sweet, delicate flavor and are, not surprisingly, the most heavily harvested crustaceans in the geographical areas in which they live. They’re found in brackish coastal lagoons and estuaries from Nova Scotia, through the Gulf of Mexico, and as far south as Uruguay. Notably, they’re considered the Chesapeake Bay’s signature crustaceans. Continue reading

Global Warming and Economic Inequality Go Hand-in-Hand

By Roberta Attanasio, IEAM Blog Editor

Climate change is reshaping our planet—not only in its physically measurable aspects, but also in terms of humanitarian challenges. Melting glaciers, rising seas, flooding, heat waves and the like are accompanied by human displacement and migration, changes in the occurrence of infectious diseases and—as highlighted by a recent study—the intensification of global economic inequality over the past half-century.

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The Dust Bowl on the Great Plains coincided with the Great Depression. South Dakota, 1936. Credit: Wikipedia

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